egypt

 
nagada, ikat, jacquard, cutwork; cotton, linen, viscose

 

Said Flower design, woven by the nagada weavers, 100% cotton

SAID Flower design, hand-woven by the Nagada weavers, 100% cotton

NAGADA-SAID motif: Woven using 100% Egyptian cotton on looms with a maximum width of 70cm the Said design is one of three main designs produced by this community of weavers in Nagada. Using a technique that was once typical to Coptic weaving methods – that of including motifs of local culture, nature and beliefs within the weave – this technique produces a double-sided effect that is a mix between weaving and tapestries. The motif here represents a flower or an ear of wheat, something local to the community.

 

 

 

 

FAIZA design, woven by the nagada weavers, 100% cotton

FAIZA design, hand-woven by the Nagada weavers, 100% cotton


NAGADA -FAIZA motif
: Woven using 100% Egyptian cotton on looms with a maximum width of 70cm the Faiza design is taken from the traditional ferka scarf that was originally woven by the nagada weavers to be imported to Sudan. This influence has been simplified and adapted to create a contemporary timeless design. References can be seen in its similarity to motifs found on pots from the pre-dynastic period in Nagada.

 

 

 

 

GAMILA design, woven by the nagada weavers, 100% cotton

GAMILA design, hand-woven by the Nagada weavers, 100% cotto

 

NAGADA-GAMILA motif: Woven using 100% Egyptian cotton on looms with a maximum width of 70cm the Gamila design was originated by Michel Pastore of Nagada for the community of weavers in Nagada, Egypt, using a traditional method of weaving called ‘brochage’ a French term which denotes a technique where by motifs are woven by using extra floating weft. Inspired by the pre-dynastic illustrations found in Nagada the Gamila motif is a contemporary design with a historic root.

 

 

 

Egyptian Ikat detail

Egyptian Ikat detail, hand-woven, cotton-viscose mix

Ikat, this Egyptian rendition of the Ikat is slightly different from the South-East Asian version in that it has no pre-determined ‘design’ the weft made from cotton yarn is pre-dyed spontaneously and woven against a solid colour viscose warp creating a wonderful illusion of colours bleeding into each other. This fabric is hand woven in Mahala, the most predominant textile community of Egypt and the heart of the cotton industry. The environment of these weavers is much more organized and commercial to that of the Nagada weavers. This fabric is traditionally used for the Gallabeya (traditional dress-like garment worn by men and women of Egypt) and therefore makes their weaving one of the last remaining traditional crafts still in commercial practice.

 

 

Jaquard

Jacquard technique, hand-woven cotton-viscose mix

Jacquard offered here in a cotton-viscose mix, is a weaving process whereby the warp is raised independently of the others creating the desired motif. This technique brings much greater versatility to the weaving process, offering the highest level of warp yarn control. It is still hand-woven today in Mahala, the heart of the Egyptian weaving industry,  The Jacquard process and the necessary loom attachment are named after their inventor, Joseph Marie-Jacquard (1752–1834).

 

 

 

 

Egyptian 'cutwork'  technique called Kheyemeya

Egyptian ‘cutwork’ technique called Khayameya, 100% Egyptian cotton

Khayameya is a needlework technique whereby a second layer of fabric is overlayed and sewn onto the base fabric creating a geometric pattern. The term Khayameya literally means ‘he who makes tents’ and this tradition of tent-making dates back to Pharaonic times when nobility would travel around in mobile tent-like structures to protect them from the sun. The art of tent-making is still alive and thriving in Egypt with very little changed when it comes to technique. Still a hand-made process, we offer an alternative to the typical heavy canvas and cotton based tents made up of colourful designs. Using light cottons and linens overlayed together, a delicacy and beauty emerges in the levels of transparency created due to the layering technique. This is the Egyptian equivalent to the Indian Cutwork technique.